Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 147
LANGUAGE
English 147
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 147 (some duplicates have been removed)
secretary of state, senator john kerry is nominated to be america's top diplomat. and good news -- the end of the world did not come today, but that did not stop some very colorful displays to mark the mine and events. -- the mayan event. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. one week after the horrifying shootings in newtown, connecticut, which left 20 children and six adults dead, the nation's top today to remember the victims, but it was also the day the country's leading gun lobby, the national rifle association, chose to lay out its case for why armed guards at every u.s. school would help prevent similar tragedies in the future. the bbc's north america editor reports. >> the church bells tolled out the exact time when a week ago a young man with an assault rifle began his massacre of children. they stood in prayer and in silence in the rain. in a town still numb, the bells tolled 26 times, one for each of the victims of the school. inside the white house, president obama and his staff since silent for a minute. beyond the grave,
in america and elsewhere around the globe. four days after the mass shootings in newtown, conn., the funerals continue for the 22 becomes lost their lives. and while the town mourns, the white house issued its strongest indication yet it will be pushing for tighter gun controls, including reinstating the assault weapons ban. from newtown, we begin our coverage. >> she loved or go wales and horses. a beautiful girl, her parents said. 6-year-old jessica was buried. another victim in america. that terrible friday as parents waited to hear what happened in the school, their pastor was with them. >> one parent, one mother in desperation cried out "are there any survivors?" there was violence. there were officials looking at one another and then they said, no, there are no survivors. i do not know that i will ever forget the noise as people wept, wales, eelam -- wailed, yelled. it was horrible noise. suddenly, reality hit. there are no survivors. >> this horror has changed the mood in america, for now at least. there of been those who have demonstrated against guns, but not a manufacturer of the we
of "bbc world news america." this community is warning the loss of 26 people including 20 children killed in a school on friday. it has ignited a debate about gun control in america. today was about the children, i got little noah and little jack pinto, to six girls who were buried today. it should a community struggling with grief and with shock. we have the latest. >> the agony of this week town was almost unbearable. first jack pinto was also buried. the town will hold the funerals of 80 more small victims of horrific violence. the parents of one of them have been speaking of their desperation as they waited outside the school on friday. >> i know exactly what she was wearing. i was going to see her black the glittery uggs should put on this morning. >> there was still hope because the children were hiding. >> then hope departed. >> there was so much panic and confusion. life was sucked out of everyone in the room. i found a state trooper and was like are there any survivors? are you telling me that standing here as a parent my child is gone and? he said yes. >> in the drizzle outside
and children are killed. the shooter is also dead. this is the 12 the mass shooting this year and america and mr. obama said that the country must take action. >> a friday morning with chris this looming. -- christmas shooting. moments later, heavily armed officers went in and it terrified children aged between 5-10 were being carried out. >> i saw some of the bullets going past the hall that i was right next to and then the teacher pulled me into her classroom. we heard shots and everyone went on the ground. >> we all went over to a corner and the teacher was to keep us until the police officers. >> they had machine guns. >> i heard seven loud booms and then the teachers told us to go in the corner. we all huddled. i kept hearing these booming noises. >> as alarmed parents rushed back to the school, are the reports told of the gun at confronting a children and three -- confronting a teacher. it became clear that this was murdered on a horrific scale. >> there were fatalities, there was 18 children that were pronounced dead at the school. there were two that were transported to area hospi
welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. 11 days and counting. that is how long u.s. lawmakers have to reach a deal or go over the fiscal cliff. for weeks, the combination of tax increases and spending cuts has been the ultimate political football in washington. there is little sign of any holiday good cheer. >> in washington, the fiscal cliff a stalemate remains. >> the latest on the fiscal cliff. >> the ugly phrase that is on everyone's lips, fiscal cliff, is what america could tumble off and 11 days. it means that if the president and congress cannot agree on a plan to sort out finances, there will be automatic savage cuts and brittle tax rises. neither side is budging much. >> it is very hard for them to say yes to me. at some point, they have got to take me out of it and think about their voters. >> four weeks, the white house said that if i move on rates, they would make substantial concessions on spending cuts and entitlement reform. i did my part. they have done nothing. >> it would mean automatic spending cuts worth more than a trillion
america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a
on public television in america and around the globe. a massive crowd surrounds the egyptian president's palace. tens of thousands have turned out in the biggest and most tense demonstration yet. against the powers of the new president and the constitution. mr. morsi has left and authorities are threatening if the walls are breached. >> police fired tear gas after they breached the line in front of the official residence. at times, the police seem close to losing control. agent has not seen anything like this even at the height of the protests against hosni mubarak last year. opposition supporters converged on the palace through the day. they are furious at the edict taking sweeping new powers. and an attempt to rush through a new constitution that opponents fear it could be used to impose islamic values. this is a series of marches. two weeks in and than not lost any of their fury and egger prodi is done. >-- and anger at what he has done. >> he is not right to be the new king creative. >> we hope he is wise enough to realize that today is the first of many marches against him if he d
before it's too late. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. bankings are usually in the business of making money and not handing it over. in a record fine, hsbc pays $1.9 billion to settle u.s. allegations of money laundering. our chief economics correspondent has all the details. >> the largest bank in money- laundering, cartels washed through the bank. it resulted in a $1.9 billion fine, the biggest in u.s. banking history. the american authorities >> the corruption of the financial system by drug traffickers and other criminals, and free evading u.s. sanctions and law. >> they find $7 billion will be transferred between mexico and the u.s.. there were 25,000 transactions involving iran. in $290 million in suspicious traveler's checks were cleared by the bank. in a statement, they said they were story -- sorry for past mistakes. the former chairman was appointed as trade minister for david cameron. he had this to say when the allegations emerged in july. >> there were failures of the implementation, they expressed regret for that. it is a c
of the united states of america to be left almost alone in the united nations against so many other countries, including the best trends of america to defend the state of israel and then to find out the next morning that israel is doing something which america explicitly is against i think you'd have been thinking twice about his position and therefore i think it was a mistake. i think we should have manifested a much greater understanding for the sensitivities of the united states and i criticize it -- >> rose: so the prime minister -- >> i think it was not the right thing to do. >> rose: when you looked a hamas have they been strengthened by this? >> well, their status, i think, has changed to the degree that at the final point of negotiations, the appearance was that the u.n. secretary general, the u.s. secretary of state, the president of egypt and a few more foreign ministers all came in a way to save hamas and the islamic jihad. now, this is rather strange that two terrorist organizations which are involved almost endlessly in killing innocent people which are exercising the most author
sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. sometimes we can see the universe in a grain of sand, as the old saying goes, but nowadays a graphic chart more vividly reveals the world we live in. take a look at this statistical snapshot of the media ecology that largely determines what you and i see, read, and hear. in 1983, 50 corporations controlled a majority of media in america. in 1990 the number had dropped to 23. in 1997, 10. and today, six. there you have it -- the fistful of multinational conglomerates that own the majority of media in america. what do we call it when a few firms dominate the market? oligopoly. doesn't quite rhyme with democracy. but today, believe it or not, big media is about to get even bigger, unless the public stands up and says "no!" here's the story. the chairman of the federal communications commission -- the fcc, the agency of government created by congress to protect the public's rightful ownership of the airwaves -- is reportedly asking the other four co
the largest collection in america. we are joined by dr. the curator and department head of literacy and historical manuscripts at the morgan library. >> here we are in mr. morgan's study. we're looking at the first installments of david copperfield. one schilling would have got you your monthly part. and here is the beginning part of the booklets and it is just page after page after page of advertisements for books and pills and remedies and all kinds of things. here you have the original illustrations that accompany each part separated by tissue, of course, so they didn't smudge each other. here's the very first page of the narrative, whether i turn out to be the hero of my own life or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. >> people buy a dickens' novel they imagine of course that that's how they were written. but they weren't. they were written month by month. was it particular to dickens? >> it was really dickens who pioneered this and was the most successful perpetrator, if you will, of publishing in installments. >> i guess you're saying that
buzz. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. egypt's military is on security watch, ordered by the president to a rest civilians who threaten the state. on saturday, and egypt will hold a controversial referendum on the constitution. there will be competing mass protests and there are fears of violence. almost two years since the arab spring began, this is not the most positive way to mark an anniversary. tonight we start a week of coverage. >> the presidential guard is like an army within an army. it has one job above all else, to protect the leader. they have even built a wall or run the presidential palace. how was it possible that a man elected five months ago is now barricaded behind giant concrete blocks? >> an mp from the president friedman justice party. for decades, under the old regime. -- the freedom and justice party. they fear a conspiracy organized by the old guard. >> we want to get rid of the black spots of the mubarak regime. that hinder our development, that hinder are going to a new egypt. >> he ought to be here in egypt's par
viewers on public television in america and around the globe. banks are in the business of making money, but today u.b.s. was forced to pay a massive amounts for actions federal regulators called shocking. the penalty was levied for trying to manipulate a key interest rates that affect our rowers around the world. the u.s. is hardly alone -- u.b.s. is hardly alone in having to pay. >> caught trying to manipulate important interest rates and punished with 940 million pounds of fines and confiscation of ill-gotten gains. >> this is some of the most shocking behavior we have seen to date. this was prevalent across the firm for five years when people were seeking to manipulate an internationally used benchmark used for millions and trillions of pounds of contracts in order to benefit their own trading position. >> u.b.s. traders colluded with other firms in market rigging. one u.b.s. a banker said to a broker, let me do one humongous deal. i will pay $100,000, whatever you want. i am a man of my word. the bank has been punished by switzerland, the u.k., and the u.s. >> make no mistake. for
the dead in newtown, connecticut, and all week, the argument over the kind of guns available in america and the kind of people that can get all of them. it has gone back and forth. while the fire he said raged, the gunman killed himself. he had already spent 17 years in prison for killing his grandmother. as a convicted criminal, he was not allowed to possess firearms. a cold christmas awaits the families of two firefighters. bbc news, washington. >> in afghanistan, at least seven security officials including an american adviser have been killed by local police officers. in the first shooting, a policewoman opened fire inside the police headquarters, killing the americans. it is the first time a female member of the afghan services has turned on a member of the nato force. a report. >> the 33-year-old was a sergeant with the afghan national police, and earlier this morning, the woman shot and killed a civilian adviser. according to officials, she had planned to kill senior afghan officials but could not find any so shot the advisor instead. at the police headquarters, it is one of the m
out their vote and is going to be exploited by virtually every merchandiser in america. >> obama's campaign manager and the rest of the team for the ground game they pulled together which the romney team laughed at first. they are not laughing now. >> mark. >> thank you. magnificent. >> is this it? >> let's see what conac has given us. the biggest winner of 2012 vladimir putin. he overcame massive opposition protests, maneuvered through constitutional loopholes, served as president, then prime minister. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candid
than ever before. >> rose: you're bullish on america? >> i think on the energy side for sure. and i'd say on the -- the one thing that never goes away in the united states is the incredible accept of entrepreneurs. so i think if we can get a set of great entrepreneurs, we can go after some big opportunities like energy. there's no reason why the united states can't continue to grow. >> rose: can manufacturing come back to america? >> if you looked -- i'm 30 year g.e. guy. so when i started it was probably 25% of american jobs were manufacturing, now it's 9%. so it is going to go back to be 25% again? probably not. could it be in the low teens? yes. >> rose: apple just announced today -- >> i saw that. i saw what tim did. we brought jobs back to the united states. i think american work force is very productive. i think in the sets of technologies that we make today you can make them here. i actually think that the relationships in general between unions and business and things like that have all progressed over time and the work force is very productive. so there's no reason why the
to america. right now china is the leading country. russia is certainly in the top 5 with over 700,000 orphans in that country. there's certainly plenty of children who need a loving family here in the united states. >> suarez: how about that side of the story. unicef estimate there is's only about 18,000 russian families looking to adopt children. that's a disproportionate number considering the need for new homes. >> it is. last year alone here in america there were a thousand children adopted from russia. there are many american families, many of whom right now are in the process of adopting these children that are willing, ready, and able to adopt these kids, some of which have severe special needs. so it speaks to the heart of these american families that are willing to adopt these kids and bring them home. the. >> suarez: but there have been unfortunate stories that have gotten a lot of attention here in the united states and back in russia >> does that make things more difficult for your organization and others that are watching international adoptions? >> sure, well, i thin
signals, and then we are off. >> reporter: in most of america, u.p.s. drivers spend a lot of time behind the wheel. not tony. he parks his truck less than two miles away for the whole day. >> i prefer to park and uh let my legs do the work, you know what i mean? >> reporter: today, tony is lucky to have the help of angel tirado, a seasonal worker. so, it's angel who delivers dozens of heavy boxes to a garment warehouse. meanwhile, tony minds the truck and gets ready for the next delivery, offering up some tips of the trade: like the importance of making friends in the buildings. >> at least once a week, every one of my freight guys, they're going to get a coffee from me. once in a while, you know, i'll go get like a couple of sandwiches. i mean, they make my life a whole lot easier. i want them liking me! >> reporter: after a while, i persuade tony to let me deliver two packages to a building across the street. that means, i'm also responsible for the diad-- the electronic clipboard tracking all the packages. i have two packages for you. >> great. >> reporter: and i need you to sign. wit
in america and also around the globe. cairo is grafton controversy. tens of thousands are now packed into the square in protest, just a week after the president assumed power that he maintained was going to be temporary. the actions amount to a coup against democracy. >> a marathon 16-hour session, the assembly rushed through the new draft constitution. the few remaining liberals and christians notice what they say is too much emphasis on islam in the draft. egyptian law should follow the principles of the islamic law, like the old constitution. and this they will protect the true nature of the egyptian family and protect morals and values, something could be used to compose islamic values. they don't like the fact that the constitution has no guaranteed equality of both men and women. as soon as there is a referendum on the constitution, he will give up his controversial powers. >> we are passing through a very short but very important phase. >> nobel prize winner says that the draft constitution should be put in a garbage can of history. and once again, the protesters are forcing n
on public television in america and also around the globe. it is an announcement many have been waiting for. today's news that the duchess of cambridge is expecting a child was greeted with delight and concern. from around the world, congratulations have been pouring in for the royal couple, including well wishes from the white house. the 30-year-old duchess is suffering from severe morning sickness. she has been hospitalized for several days. our royal correspondent starts our coverage. >> departing from hospital this evening, the father to be. william had spent several hours with his wife. they had driven to london earlier together. it was earlier this week and that the sickness started. certainly no sign of anything last friday when kate was playing hockey in high heels. nor had there been any hint of what was the county -- was to come a couple of days earlier. william was presented with a baby gift. doctors say severe sickness that such an early stage should not be a cause for early concerned -- because of concern -- be a cause of concern. >> it is a difficult time for them to be going
to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. in egypt tonight, pitched battles on the streets of cairo and -- between supporters and opponents of the president there. there have been violent clashes for the second day outside the presidential power us -- palace in cairo. demonstrators have been during petrol bombs. four senior advisers have resigned. what are the chances for a peaceful resolution? that is the question i asked the state department spokesman p.j. crowley. >> we have had the former head of the iaea suggesting that morsi is now worse than hosni mubarak. is getting quite tense there, isn't it? >> it is. and the tension between institutions is actually potentially constructive. and every faction is sending their groups into the streets, or the muslim brotherhood is sending dogs to intimidate the court. this could create a very tense situation and potentially spiral out of control. >> how accurate are those comments about morsi? >> we do not know yet. none of those statements necessarily mean there is anything other than competition. you have t
-life speckles over water in south america. it is called "a dark truth." it is available from video on demand starting november 29. now, a scene from "a dark truth ." >> my wife -- she does not trust you. >> i know. >> she think our family will not be safe. >> is your family safe here? how long can they live like this? >> the answer is always the same until we die. >> come with me. we will stop them from doing what they did here, in other countries. you have to trust me. francisco. you must trust me. you must trust me. tavis: first of all, good to see you again. about this project -- i have been reading so much lately about how, into the future, whirs will continue to be fought, sadly. more and more, we are going to fight over is not religion, not geography, who has the right to decide the line. we are going to be fighting over water. >> it is a sustainable item. tavis: who controls the water sources? into the fray comes this wonderful project, "a dark truth." i will let you explain the character you play, then i want to get into the film. so many real-life issues run through this movie. i wa
viewers on public television in america. in a tragic turn of events, the nurse who took a prank call from two australian deejays about the duchess of cambridge has been found dead. a hospital, where she is treated earlier this week, said she was a well-respected member of their staff who had been the victim of a hoax. a warning, there is some flash photography. >> it was a call to a hospital three days ago which its makers thought would be funny. at 9:30, police were called to an accommodation near the hospital where they found the body of jacintah saldanha. >> she was the victim of a hoax call to the hospital. a hospital had been supporting her through this difficult time. jacintha cared diligently for hundreds of patients during her time with us. everyone is shocked by the loss of a much loved and a valued colleague. >> in a statement, a spokesman said the duke and duchess were deeply saddened to learn of the death of saldanha. "they were looked after so wonderfully well at all times. their thoughts and prayers are family andnha's friends." the call was made by two austrian ra
to a contraction of 1.5% in the value of all goods and services america producers meaning less money to afraid with the rest of the world. as far as the republicans concerned, there is that we will not give you a blank check. >> mitch mcconnell, the republican leader in the senate, said that he thought there was still time to avert what he called a budgetary fiscal crisis on tuesday the 31st. all of these attacks increases and spending cuts kick in. he is not very optimistic that the deal can be done. everybody is blaming each other. people in the senate have convened today, the house of rep is evidence, particularly the house of representatives. and as a lot of talking lot of brinkmanship, a lot of blame being traded and quite a lot of talking. no sign of a breakthrough. >> mr. obama has been talking to various congress people, looking at the pictures coming to us from the floor of the house, it does not look particularly busy. it does not look like there is a sense of urgency percolating through the system at the moment. >> president obama got back from his holiday early. the senate has conv
forward to an america that will not be afraid of grace and bite. i look forward to an american that will honor achievement in the arts, the way we honor achievement in business or state craft. and that's what the kennedy center honors are. >> we conclude this evening with the stars and director of the new film, this is 40. joining us paul rudd, leslie mann and judd apatow. >> i think it is a couple that my own opinion is that they love each other and they're deal well problems that a lot of marriages deal with. and maybe they're just handling it in the wrong way sometimes. and i think they're kind of succumbing to the pressures of all of it. >> like paul said we kind of share a brain and so we, you know, we have a shorthand with each other, with all of it. and we have i mean we're constantly having conversations about what we are-- about screens and these characters. >> it is person. we debate all the time how truthful it is, and how personal it is. and some days it is like this is really personal, this isn't like us at all. so we change our opinion moment to moment,. >> rose:
they doing. you have america the most powerful nation in the planet and you have this guy. i take people behind the scenes to see whattate would be like to be an officer and what it would be like to be tracking osama, and me you did it. >> rose: kathryn bigelow and mark boal coming up. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countries, friends and allies. the death of bin laden signifies the most significant achievement to date in our effort counterterrorisms professionals to work tire loalsly to achieve this outcome. the american people do not see their work nor know their names but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and the resul
do go after guns and try to, quote, disarm america, did you know on black friday, the day after thanksgiving, 155,000 requests came to the fbi for clearances to buy guns. >> eleanor. >> right, and that is the paranoia of people, that it is falled by a lot of dark impulses, which we're not going to go into here but we live in a culture that is awash in guns where people have easy access to guns to wreak mayhem. when i was a kid we used to duck under the desk because we were afraid of the nuclear bomb coming. kids today do drills in case a lone gunman comes into the classroom so they know what to do. i don't think we want to live in a society like that. and this horrific event may be the tipping point that injects some courage into our politicians. this president, like the president before him, george w. bush, say they will sign an assault weapons ban if it comes to their desk. but neither has done anything to make that happen. so i think if the president is looking for a second term, crusade, if you will, he should take this on, and maybe the parents of america will be riled up e
philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad, but especially, you know, our music. >> rose: tell me about the music of venezuela. >> well, look, what we are bringing is the -- i think it is the most important piece right in venezuela, by michael estevez and a piece for a big choir, two soloist, a tenor and a baritone. >> a huge orchestra, you can feel what is about
that are going to hit america in the gut. i think impact would be really strong. if anybody thinks this is going to be a slope better wake up. >> ifill: the link between brain injury and sports, new evidence ties repeated blows to the head to long-term damage. we take a look. >> brown: ray suarez looks at the firestorm over israel's announcement it will expand settlements in the west bank. >> ifill: elizabeth brackett looks at how one chicago school is dealing with the transition to new state-wide standards. >> i really did find that the kids do understand more, and they learn more. they're more interested in what they're learning. >> brown: plus, as global carbon dioxide levels hit record highs, we analyze the increasing difficulty of combating climate change, with carol davenport of the "national journal." >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financi
else would, as a parent. and that was especially true today. i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children. and for the family its of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it's a elementary school in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon, or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a s
,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virginia tech. every single day. and you done cover it because it's 34 separate occurrences around the country. and it doesn't grab the public's imagination, psyche, sympathy, there's just-- you don't get a visceral reaction when it's people you don't know and can't see. >> rose: have we got that now, the visceral reaction that this is somehow different because it children. >> i sure hope so i was asked today is it different with children. it is in the public psyche. but i think if you talk to the families of teenagers and even adults who were killed before the sympathyes with their loss is exactly the same as the parents of young people. but young people that people look and say oh my god what are we really doing here. >> rose: what is your criticism of the president of the united states? >> well, i don't know that criticism is the right word. i believe that his job is to lead. when you
house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. having served with valor in vietnam, he understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from personal experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together-- diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence-- as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust
is the most diverse state in the union. we best represent the upon population of the united states of america. we're very dwirs, but i think we need to show the nation that a group of people committed to the common good can come together and pass a law that's necessary for the public safety, whether you're in a rural area, a suburban or urban area, we all have children. those of white house are parents understand how precious life is. we have a great poeet from illinois, carl sandberg who said, "the birth of a baby is god's opinion the world should go on." it's high time we protect our children, protect our babies from the harm of assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> ifill: do you have any sense that public opinion is shifting in your state? >> oh, i believe so. i don't think there's any question. anecdotally, just visiting with the people on the street-- i was at a daycare center today, an early-childhood center, and you can tell how committed moms and dads are to getting a law pads to protect their children. no matter where you live in america, children come first. the
in america and around the globe. after days of demonstrations, the egyptian president has appeared on national television to try to allay fears over his leadership. muhamed morsi said dialogue was needed to solve this crisis. he has invited all major political factions to a meeting on saturday. but he is refusing to rescind his sweeping new powers in a constitution drafted by his allies. here is the latest. >> thanks and barbara are outside the presidential palace in cairo. after a night of violence, the republican guard moved in and demanded protesters leave the area. they are now protecting a beleaguered president morsi. some are still maintaining a vigil outside. >> mohammad morsi, one of the biggest opponents of the old regime, is now holed up with the army protecting him inside the presidential palace while his opponents protest outside. >> increasingly, the jansing is calling for the president to go. -- of the chanting is calling for the president to go. >> we want his resignation and a constitution. we are protesting against morsi. >> but tonight, the president gave a defian
party made the last two years is trying to make obama the issue without sharing with america bold reform ideas that get people inspired to get behind us. >> that is south carolina republican jim demint, who has decided to leave the senate to head the heritage foundation, the conservative think tank. why is evening, mar -- why is he is leaving, mark? >> jim demint is a movement guy. not a legislator like fritz hollings who represents the state for generations. he has been a movement by. you see the movement in primaries that republicans lost where they should of one the general election, whether it was delaware, or supporting marco rubio early against charlie crist. the other unwritten stories that you have two major conservative figures leaving this week. you had big armey leaving freedomworks, a very conservative outfit aligned with the tea party, and getting, get this, and $8 million buyout. jim demint has a net worth -- average of $41,000. he is going to institution that pays its chief executive more than $1 million. armey-demint -- if the congregationalist. they came to do good and t
might be more supportive in the long run of america and the west? >> there is something to that. it is hard to pick and choose, but there is a case for differentiating, of saying, we are going to try to advance certain people in the opposition. we should not kid ourselves even though they use the word coalition. it is not a single unit by any stretch of the imagination, so why don't we look for military and intelligence support for those individuals and groups who can do effective fighting? we think we are more likely to move indirections' we think we can support. there might not be that large a set of people that can fit those criteria. >> how much support you think the u.s. is giving those groups at the moment? >> it is my understanding is fairly modest. it is mostly nonlethal aid. with few exceptions, i do not think the problem facing the opposition is lack of arms. they have captured a lot. there have been some defections, so while they could probably use anti armor and anti helicopter tight arms, they have more than enough. i think it is more the organization and their lead
will be the last political victim of the fallout. >> is this a loss for america? the people generally think susan rice would have made a good secretary of state? >> people have very different opinions on her. the acrimony that accompanied the attacks is not something many people will welcome. this is not how politics should be conducted in washington. also, the president said the attacks against her had been unfair. she was also being pilloried in the american media by some of her colleagues for being undiplomatic. a lot of people thought she would not have made a good secretary of state. we will never find out. she has done the gracious thing and about out of the race before president obama had to make a decision about whether or not to appoint her. that is not to say she will not get any position in the next administration. she could get a position that does not require congressional confirmation >> is there anyone who he was not spying for? the former russian agent who was poisoned to death six years ago was actually working for both the british and spanish intelligence services of the time of
foundation. barbara g. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing group, individual, and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. the bells rang for the lost. charlotte bacon, olivia engle, anna marquez green, catherine hubbard, emilie parker, jack pinto, noah posner, jessica ricos, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. all were 6 years old. daniel barden and grace mcdonald were 7. six adults died with them. mary sherlock, dawn hochsprung, victoria soto. it helps to say their names to rescue them from the statistical anonymity that always settles over these awful events. it helps those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance i
that awful night to try to protect them, and we owe it to thousands of our colleagues serving america with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made po
. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually rarely put pen to paper himself. so what is the significance of this typewriter you have in the exhi business. >> are you absolutely write. churchill favorite method of working was by dictation. and this is what was then a state of the art silence typewrite
layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000 new private sector jobs were added in november, fewer than in october. the blame for last month's slowdown in hiring falls squarely on hurricane sandy, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming we
in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of five an ten years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women without devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children, and for the families of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early. and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it's in elementary school in newton or a shopping mall in oregon or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a street corner in chicago, these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods. and these
of these incidents happening in america makes me say, you know, enough is enough. there's got to be a rational way to sort through this. i'm not saying i've got a perfect piece of legislation. i don't think there is a single perfect piece of legislation. but in a country where we got 30,000 gun deaths a year, there's got to be a way that we can do a bit more. i hope that responsible gun owners around america will join in this conversation as well. i think we have to recognize that it is about rational appropriate gun rules but also about mental health issues. my hope is our country takes a deep breath and doesn't just simply get exercised by this for a few moments and then push this horrible tragedy back into the background and forget about it. >> ifill: assuming that there is is not one single solution here, let's talk about what you mean when you say rational gun control. senator feinstein says an assault weapons ban would be rational. would you agree with that? >> i think that from the evidence i've seen that a lot of the challenge comes around the speed by which you can shoot... in effect, you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 147 (some duplicates have been removed)